National Day Of Mourning

We remember those who have lost their lives, or suffered injury or illness on the job or due to a work-related tragedy

Today marks the National Day of Mourning.

The day is dedicated to remembering those who have lost their lives, or suffered injury or illness on the job or due to a work-related tragedy.

The Canadian flag will fly at half-staff on Parliament Hill and on all federal government buildings.

Employers and workers will observe Day of Mourning in a variety of ways. Some light candles, lay wreaths, wear commemorative pins, ribbons or black armbands, and pause for a moment of silence at 11:00 a.m.

The Statistics

  • In 2017 951 workplace fatalities were recorded in Canada, an increase of 46 from the previous year (source: Association of Workers’ Compensation Boards of Canada)
  • Among these deaths were 23 young workers aged 15-24. Beyond the Statistics (source: AWCBC)
  • 251,508 accepted claims (an increase from 241,508 the previous year) for lost time due to a work-related injury or disease, including 31,441 from workers aged 15-24

History

  • The day of remembrance was launched by the Canadian Labour Congress in 1983
  • In 1991, the Parliament of Canada passed the Workers Mourning Day Act making April 28th an official Day of Mourning
  • The Day of Mourning has since spread to more than 100 countries around the world and is recognized as Workers’ Memorial Day, and as International Workers’ Memorial Day by the International Labour Organisation (ILO) and the International Trade Union Confederation (ITUC)